Goals:

  • To help launch boys and girls into the Christian discipleship process by giving them a challenging environment to grow biblically, spiritually, and socially.  Each student will be prepared to face the obstacles of high school life by the time they are promoted from the eighth grade.
  • Also, to equip the students with the basic tools so that they can practice their faith in any environment they find themselves faced with the challenges of life.

Essential Components:

  • Students interact with their teacher who gives them the necessary means to discover spiritual content (and life skills) on their own.
  • Bible is the primary instrument used to communicate the truth about God. Students are encouraged to encounter God in the holy writings of Scripture.
  • Students are expected to apply what they learn to their relationships with teachers, other students, family, friends, and in their churches.
  • Students complete projects to learn content and express the spirit of their teachings through Christian service.  Opportunities will be given to the students so that they can do what they are learning.  This includes the opportunity to pray.

6th Grade:

Discipleship starts early for students at East Linn Christian.  They are challenged in this grade to understand and apply the lessons from Genesis to Deuteronomy, the Pentateuch. As in our entire Bible curriculum, a focus on Jesus as the central figure of each and every book is also highlighted in the LAW.

The young men and women are encouraged to hide the Word of God in their hearts (Psalm 119:9), and to become examples of the believer in all of their behavior (1Timothy 4:12). 

We acknowledge that the sixth grade student still sees his/her world in a black and white way.  They are still leaning on the adults in their lives to inform them.  The teachers are instructed to stay as close to the text of Scripture as they can.   Speculation and opinion is no replacement for clear biblical instruction. 

Sixth graders’ relationship to the Word (John 1:1; Hebrews 4:12) is budding at this point in their lives and it is the teacher’s responsibility to water the seed that has been sown in their lives.  The constant attention to nourishing the students spiritually will, we believe, translate into a full grown disciple some day.

We do not overlook the importance of the student’s social involvement.  Guidance is given to equip him/her here.

7th Grade:

As the disciples mature, more and more is expected out of them.  A greater amount of memory work is assigned and the scope of the biblical material is broadened to include Joshua through 1Kings 11. 

Commitment to Christ is emphasized in the class.  Most students, having made an initial response to the gospel, are now in a place where their life with Christ will begin to grow like Jesus taught in the gospel (John 15).  Therefore, students are encouraged by their teacher to remain in Christ and bear spiritual fruit from that relationship.

Some students at this age begin to branch out and formulate opinions on their own, and they can handle wrestling with more advanced issues in regard to their faith.  This knowledge will be helpful when the class deals with the more difficult issues that come up in the Conquest and Settlement time periods in the Old Covenant. 

Students will memorize two chapters from the epistle of James during the course of their study.  These key passages of Scripture will enlighten the pathway of their faith walk.

8th Grade:

This is the final stopping point before high school.  Students will be expected to take their time in Bible very seriously.  Time in Scripture, in class and out, is preparation for the challenges of life ahead.  Some would say that junior high is the most traumatic time period in a person’s life; but while this may be true from a physical growth and identity perspective, it is the high school years that have the greatest impact on the long-term choices students will make. 

At this grade level a strong emphasis is placed on the student owning their faith and growing in their commitment to Christ.  Students will work on projects that will enable them to make good life choices; for example, in the study of the Divided Kingdom they are faced with the examples of the Kings who either abandoned the God of Israel or led reforms to lead the people back to God.  These biblical models serve to help them make the right decisions about the kind of friends they will pursue, as well as the attitude they should have toward sin and modern idolatry. 

At this point in the student’s bible memory they will have finished the entire book of James. 

Through Scripture, the Holy Spirit, and the teacher our young disciples will be ready to handle the challenges of a rigorous high school life.