High school students refine their understanding of systems’ characteristics, form, function, interactions and changes. They deepen their knowledge of atomic structures, the Periodic Table, physical and chemical properties, the laws of motion, matter and mass, and chemical bonds, strengths and reactions. Life science studies include cellular structures and processes, laws of heredity, DNA, reproduction, genetic diversity, the evolution vs. creationism debate, and change in ecosystems. Students evaluate the impact of human activities on the Earth. They use scientific inquiry skills to design and investigation, collect, organize, display, summarize, analyze and interpret data and propose and communicate explanations supported by data. They learn how science and technology interact. Students evaluate ways that ethics, public opinion and government impact human society and the environment. During high school students have the opportunity through science elective courses to learn more about chemistry, physics or the human body in anatomy and physiology. Throughout all course runs a Biblical thread: God is the creator and sustainer of all things (John 1:3), and that only through God are the glories of science possible. Stand still and consider the wondrous works of God (Job 37:14).

Physical Science is a survey of basic chemistry and physics concepts. The course begins by studying matter, the elements and how they are arranged on the Periodic Table. Basic chemical reactions, naming and bonding are introduced. Next the course delves into Newton’s Laws and introduces forces and motion, work and energy, and simple machines. The course also introduces waves and how they relate to energy, sound and light. When time permits the course is closed with a brief introduction to electricity and magnetism.

Biology is the study of life. This course begins by examining truth so the student is prepared to examine life through the proper creationist perspective. A review of chemistry and organic molecules invites the student into the fascinating world of cells (the building blocks of all life). Many cellular processes such as photosynthesis, respiration and protein synthesis are examined. Cell division is the launching pad for the study of Genetics. The course then focuses on understanding the theory of evolution and the questions it is unable to answer. This in-depth study logically leads us to the need for a creator. Applications of Bilogical sciences are touched on in the realm of Biotechnology. We then focus on interactions of living things in ecosystems. We end the year with a survey of life and how man categorizes it.

Chemistry, a branch of physical science, is the study of the composition, properties and behavior of matter. Chemistry is concerned with atoms and their interactions with other atoms, and particularly with the properties of chemical bonds. Chemistry is also concerned with the interactions between atoms (or groups of atoms) and various forms of energy (e.g. photochemical reactions, changes in phases of matter, separation of mixtures, properties of polymers, etc.).
Chemistry is sometimes called "the central science" because it bridges other natural sciences like physics, geology and biology with each other. Chemistry is a branch of physical science but distinct from physics.

Anatomy and Physiology is a survey of the human body. The course begins with an orientation of the hierarchy of organization in living things. Anatomical and directional terms are introduced as well. The majority of the year is spent studying the physiology and anatomy of the eleven major systems of the body.